the tao of jaklumen

the path of the sage must become the path of the hero


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Equilibrium in Yin-Yang review

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read them before).

To recap and review, I give you two trailers for the film.  The first is more yin (dark) aspect, covering the destructive side of the movie– the destruction of the mother-wife of Preston’s family, and the destructive side of Preston as Tetragrammaton Cleric, First Class.

The second is more yang (light) aspect, covering the rise of John Preston to Champion of the Resistance, and his communications with Jurgen.  It is the official trailer for the U.S. market.

Taijitu, or “diagram of ultimate power”, in classic Taoist representation. The white is Yin while the black is Yang, and the dots indicate their crossing and merging interaction.

As in the Taijitu, there are cross-elements– the more yin-like trailer has yang element, and the more yang-like trailer still has yin.

Where there was destruction and darkness, creation and light fought to break free, and John Preston witnessed that light, sometimes very literally.  But Preston had to fight for this light, and as the Angel of Death, he destroyed agents of darkness.

Note that yin (dark) energy is associated with the feminine and the night, while yang (light) energy is associated with the masculine and the day.  There is a good summary at Wikipedia.  While Kurt Wimmer references Western notions of masculinity and femininity, these Eastern concepts remain, even in the ways he uses white and black colors in the film.

Furthermore, Angus MacFayden (Vice-Counsel Dupont) says in Finding: ‘Equilibrium’ that the story is “almost a Buddhist tale” where good must oppose evil.

Opposition in all things, dear readers.

For it must needs be, that there is an aopposition in all things. If not so, my firstborn in the wilderness, righteousness could not be brought to pass, neither wickedness, neither holiness nor misery, neither good nor bad. Wherefore, all things must needs be a compound in one; wherefore, if it should be one body it must needs remain as dead, having no life neither death, nor corruption nor incorruption, happiness nor misery, neither sense nor insensibility. (2 Nephi, chapter 2, version 27, The Book of Mormon)

This is one of the bridges between my LDS faith and philosophical Taoism.  Hence, this blog remains “the tao of jaklumen”.

FINAL POST IN THE SERIES: Hero’s Journey Art: John Preston

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Preston and the Resistance destroy the old order: Freedom to Live

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read them before).

Freedom to live could also be summed up as living in the moment.  Such as it is with the ending of Equilibrium.  There is no hint of the future, nor is there any allusion to the past (besides the age of Libria being after a World War III sometime in our current future).  There is only an expression of the enjoyment of freedom.

First, Preston destroys the propaganda machines. It is notable that he places some of the blood he spilled (that remains on him) on the image of Father before blasting the screen (symbolically sealing Father’s end), and then shooting all the other terminals from the propaganda center and emerging to another “T” shaped doorway to meet the mid-day sun.

Explosions fire in the distance, signaling the Resistance have fulfilled their mission as Jurgen promised: bombs detonated in each of the Prozium centers.

There is a cut to Robbie at Clerical school, Jurgen and the Resistance leaders at the incinerator, and Lisa (Preston’s daughter), who hear the noise of the blasts and each smile in turn. We see the dog that Preston rescued, licking Lisa’s hand.

Other Resistance members emerge from the Underground, killing Sweeps en masse.

The next scenes cut back to Preston surveying the scene, still clutching Mary O’Brien’s ribbon, and a smile slowly spreading across his face.

Preston clutching and stroking Mary O’Brien’s ribbon, that still carries her perfume

 

A reminder that Preston is Master of Two Worlds: emotionless Tetragrammaton Cleric and empathetic Champion of the Resistance

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Equilibrium in Yin-Yang review

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Equilibrium in Yin-Yang review

To recap and review, I give you two trailers for the film.  The first is more yin (dark) aspect, covering the destructive side of the movie– the destruction of the mother-wife of Preston’s family, and the destructive side of Preston as Tetragrammaton Cleric, First Class.

The second is more yang (light) aspect, covering the rise of John Preston to Champion of the Resistance, and his communications with Jurgen.  It is the official trailer for the U.S. market.

Taijitu, or “diagram of ultimate power”, in classic Taoist representation. The white is Yin while the black is Yang, and the dots indicate their crossing and merging interaction.

As in the Taijitu, there are cross-elements– the more yin-like trailer has yang element, and the more yang-like trailer still has yin.

Where there was destruction and darkness, creation and light fought to break free, and John Preston witnessed that light, sometimes very literally.  But Preston had to fight for this light, and as the Angel of Death, he destroyed agents of darkness.

Note that yin (dark) energy is associated with the feminine and the night, while yang (light) energy is associated with the masculine and the day.  There is a good summary at Wikipedia.  While Kurt Wimmer references Western notions of masculinity and femininity, these Eastern concepts remain, even in the ways he uses white and black colors in the film.

Furthermore, Angus MacFayden (Vice-Counsel Dupont) says in Finding: ‘Equilibrium’ that the story is “almost a Buddhist tale” where good must oppose evil.

Opposition in all things, dear readers.

For it must needs be, that there is an aopposition in all things. If not so, my firstborn in the wilderness, righteousness could not be brought to pass, neither wickedness, neither holiness nor misery, neither good nor bad. Wherefore, all things must needs be a compound in one; wherefore, if it should be one body it must needs remain as dead, having no life neither death, nor corruption nor incorruption, happiness nor misery, neither sense nor insensibility. (2 Nephi, chapter 2, verse 27, The Book of Mormon)

This is one of the bridges between my LDS faith and philosophical Taoism.  Hence, this blog remains “the tao of jaklumen”.

FINAL POST IN THE SERIES: Hero’s Journey Art: John Preston