the tao of jaklumen

the path of the sage must become the path of the hero


Leave a comment

Final Fight: Confronting the Powerless Father and Atonement with the Mother

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy on Monday.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read them before).

I will make a controversial claim here, that Wimmer is actually drawing upon the female version of the Monomyth in a manner of speaking, or rather an alternate interpretation by Valerie Estelle Frankel.

Specifically, the first variation is Confronting The Powerless Father.  Earlier in the film, we learned that Dupont was the creator of the Gun Kata, a martial arts extension to firearms that is a basis of Cleric training.

He does not seem to be powerless at first; after all, he seems to know about Preston’s actions all along (see Not Without Incident: Master of Two Worlds), and his challenge to a Gun Kata duel suggests he knows all about Partridge as well: “Be careful, Preston, you’re treading on my dreams” (the reference to Yeats).  But despite creating the Gun Kata, Dupont is disarmed by Preston, and so he tries to appeal to Preston’s newfound sense of emotion, to avoid the killing bullet.  How can he kill someone who is living and feeling?

But Preston sees O’Brien’s face in his mind, before her death.  This would suggest Atonement with The Mother, or rather, The Goddess.  Yet there is an atonement to a Father– just not Libria‘s Father, or Dupont.  Preston’s response of “I pay it gladly” is an echo of Partridge’s earlier line: “A heavy cost.  I pay it gladly” when Preston asked him why he forsook the idealism of Libria.  Partridge is sort of a Father in this sense, especially considering Preston echoed other words and actions of his earlier in the story as well.

Killing Dupont, who is the false Father, leads Preston towards obtaining the Ultimate Boon, which will be the next part of this series, leading towards the end.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston and the Resistance destroy the old order: Freedom to Live

Enhanced by Zemanta


Leave a comment

Not Without Incident: Master of Two Worlds and Crossing the Return Threshold

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read them before).

After his revelation that he is Father now, Dupont taunts Preston, claiming that his quest has failed, and that Preston will surrender to him “entirely without incident”.

Although the polygraph meter is flailing now, indicating strong emotion (possibly rage), Preston protests, “No. Not without incident,” and the meter flatlines, suggesting he is able to return to an emotionless state as he was as Libria’s top-ranking Cleric, or the “Angel of Death” as Kurt Wimmer explains himself in the audio commentary.

After blowing the projection screen (with the image of Dupont) to bits, Preston proceeds to the Hall of Mirrors, the final challenge and gateway before the Tetragrammaton Council Chamber.

“I’m coming.”

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston dispatches Brandt: Road of Trials is complete

Enhanced by Zemanta


Leave a comment

Preston dispatches Brandt: Road of Trials is complete

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read them before).

Preston’s arrival reveals that the Tetragrammaton Council is rotten and hypocritical to the core, opulent and ostentatious to a level that would scarcely be permitted by the masses (i.e., it would be labeled offensive and subject to destruction by burning).  The Council cares only about power and control, and like many tyrannical dictators, does not follow the rules set for whom they rule.

Preston quickly dispatches about a half dozen Clerics, as well as Brandt, literally cutting off not just his smug expression, but his entire face.  The Road of Trials is essentially over, but not before dealing with Dupont.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Final Fight: Confronting the Powerless Father and Atonement with the Mother

Enhanced by Zemanta


Leave a comment

Preston meets with Father: Beginning of the Return

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read them before).

It is explained a few times at this point in the film, in Preston’s meetings with Jurgen (Preston saying so) and with Dupont (Dupont saying so), that Father has never granted an audience with anyone, as the risk of assassination is too great.

But Preston gives an offer that cannot be refused: he will turn in all the leaders of the Resistance in exchange for a meeting with Father.

Preston sets up the triple-cross by calling the Vice-Council to return in the leaders of the Resistance

 

Preston is visibly holding Mary O’Brien’s ribbon, symbolic of her favor as the Goddess

Preston wears a white uniform instead of the usual black of the Senior Cleric, symbolizing his transformation to Champion of the Resistance is complete.

However, he finds that he must pass the same Challenge that Jurgen administered: another polygraph test.  The first question he is posed is “more of a riddle”, as the examiner says: “What would you say is the easiest way to get a weapon away from a Grammaton Cleric?”

He is shocked to find Brandt answering the question for him: “You ask him for it.”  He smiles and winks to Preston with a taunt.  “I told you, I’d make my career with you, Cleric.”

“Brandt’s job was simple,” Father (Sean Pertwee, son of Dr. Who‘s Jon Pertwee) explains from a telescreen, “to make you feel like you’d won.”  He explains it was his idea all along to infiltrate the Resistance with a Cleric who could feel, but didn’t know it yet.

“But, we’ve never met,” claims Preston.  Then the second rude awakening comes: the image of Father switches to Vice-Council Dupont, who reveals that the original Father had died and he had assumed his place.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Not Without Incident: Master of Two Worlds and Crossing the Return Threshold

Enhanced by Zemanta


6 Comments

Preston becomes a Sense Offender: Apotheosis

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read this before).

Preston is so grief-stricken in public that Brandt arrests him for sense offense, first publicly shaming him to the masses before bringing him to Vice-Counsel Dupont.  In a clever turnaround, however, he leads Dupont to believe that Brandt was guilty of all his crimes, including the murder of the Sweeps in the Nether (see Preston further embraces emotion: Belly of the Whale).  Brandt is hauled off, presumably to meet judgement and execution by incineration.

Dupont informs Preston that while Brandt is guilty, his home must be searched according to the law.  Racing home, Preston goes to check the mirror of the bathroom where he had been hiding the Prozium, and discovers his son with the vials, apparently implying it wasn’t a very good hiding place.  Preston asks him, “How long?”, suspecting that somehow his son had ceased the dose and had hidden it better, even from him.  Robbie reveals that he and his sister had done so since their mother did.  Preston’s next question, “How did you know?” leads Robbie to utter a familiar refrain that Preston and Brandt had each uttered: “It’s my job to know what you’re thinking.”

“Then you know what I’m going to do now,” Preston replies, and his son nods, which leads to our next post concerning Atonement with the Father.

HeroesjourneyRebirthTransformationNEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston meets with Father: Beginning of the Return

Enhanced by Zemanta


1 Comment

Final Fight: Confronting the Powerless Father and Atonement with the Mother

I will make a controversial claim here, that Wimmer is actually drawing upon the female version of the Monomyth in a manner of speaking, or rather an alternate interpretation by Valerie Estelle Frankel.

Specifically, the first variation is Confronting The Powerless Father.  Earlier in the film, we learned that Dupont was the creator of the Gun Kata, a martial arts extension to firearms that is a basis of Cleric training.

He does not seem to be powerless at first; after all, he seems to know about Preston’s actions all along (see Not Without Incident: Master of Two Worlds), and his challenge to a Gun Kata duel suggests he knows all about Partridge as well: “Be careful, Preston, you’re treading on my dreams” (the reference to Yeats).  But despite creating the Gun Kata, Dupont is disarmed by Preston, and so he tries to appeal to Preston’s newfound sense of emotion, to avoid the killing bullet.  How can he kill someone who is living and feeling?

But Preston sees O’Brien’s face in his mind, before her death.  This would suggest Atonement with The Mother, or rather, The Goddess.  Yet there is an atonement to a Father– just not Libria‘s Father, or Dupont.  Preston’s response of “I pay it gladly” is an echo of Partridge’s earlier line: “A heavy cost.  I pay it gladly” when Preston asked him why he forsook the idealism of Libria.  Partridge is sort of a Father in this sense, especially considering Preston echoed other words and actions of his earlier in the story as well.

Killing Dupont, who is the false Father, leads Preston towards obtaining the Ultimate Boon, which will be the next part of this series, leading towards the end.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston and the Resistance destroy the old order: Freedom to Live


Leave a comment

Preston dispatches Brandt: Road of Trials is complete

Preston’s arrival reveals that the Tetragrammaton Council is rotten and hypocritical to the core, opulent and ostentatious to a level that would scarcely be permitted by the masses (i.e., it would be labeled offensive and subject to destruction by burning).  The Council cares only about power and control, and like many tyrannical dictators, does not follow the rules set for whom they rule.

Preston quickly dispatches about a half dozen Clerics, as well as Brandt, literally cutting off not just his smug expression, but his entire face.  The Road of Trials is essentially over, but not before dealing with Dupont.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Final Fight: Confronting the Powerless Father and Atonement with the Mother


Leave a comment

Not Without Incident: Master of Two Worlds and Crossing the Return Threshold

After his revelation that he is Father now, Dupont taunts Preston, claiming that his quest has failed, and that Preston will surrender to him “entirely without incident”.

Although the polygraph meter is flailing now, indicating strong emotion (possibly rage), Preston protests, “No. Not without incident,” and the meter flatlines, suggesting he is able to return to an emotionless state as he was as Libria’s top-ranking Cleric, or the “Angel of Death” as Kurt Wimmer explains himself in the audio commentary.

After blowing the projection screen (with the image of Dupont) to bits, Preston proceeds to the Hall of Mirrors, the final challenge and gateway before the Tetragrammaton Council Chamber.

“I’m coming.”

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston dispatches Brandt: Road of Trials is complete


Leave a comment

Preston meets with Father: Beginning of the Return

It is explained a few times at this point in the film, in Preston’s meetings with Jurgen (Preston saying so) and with Dupont (Dupont saying so), that Father has never granted an audience with anyone, as the risk of assassination is too great.

But Preston gives an offer that cannot be refused: he will turn in all the leaders of the Resistance in exchange for a meeting with Father.

Preston sets up the triple-cross by calling the Vice-Council to return in the leaders of the Resistance

 

Preston is visibly holding Mary O’Brien’s ribbon, symbolic of her favor as the Goddess

Preston wears a white uniform instead of the usual black of the Senior Cleric, symbolizing his transformation to Champion of the Resistance is complete.

However, he finds that he must pass the same Challenge that Jurgen administered: another polygraph test.  The first question he is posed is “more of a riddle”, as the examiner says: “What would you say is the easiest way to get a weapon away from a Grammaton Cleric?”

He is shocked to find Brandt answering the question for him: “You ask him for it.”  He smiles and winks to Preston with a taunt.  “I told you, I’d make my career with you, Cleric.”

“Brandt’s job was simple,” Father (Sean Pertwee, son of Dr. Who‘s Jon Pertwee) explains from a telescreen, “to make you feel like you’d won.”  He explains it was his idea all along to infiltrate the Resistance with a Cleric who could feel, but didn’t know it yet.

“But, we’ve never met,” claims Preston.  Then the second rude awakening comes: the image of Father switches to Vice-Council Dupont, who reveals that the original Father had died and he had assumed his place.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Not Without Incident: Master of Two Worlds and Crossing the Return Threshold


Leave a comment

Preston becomes a Sense Offender: Apotheosis

Preston is so grief-stricken in public that Brandt arrests him for sense offense, first publicly shaming him to the masses before bringing him to Vice-Counsel Dupont.  In a clever turnaround, however, he leads Dupont to believe that Brandt was guilty of all his crimes, including the murder of the Sweeps in the Nether (see Preston further embraces emotion: Belly of the Whale).  Brandt is hauled off, presumably to meet judgement and execution by incineration.

Dupont informs Preston that while Brandt is guilty, his home must be searched according to the law.  Racing home, Preston goes to check the mirror of the bathroom where he had been hiding the Prozium, and discovers his son with the vials, apparently implying it wasn’t a very good hiding place.  Preston asks him, “How long?”, suspecting that somehow his son had ceased the dose and had hidden it better, even from him.  Robbie reveals that he and his sister had done so since their mother did.  Preston’s next question, “How did you know?” leads Robbie to utter a familiar refrain that Preston and Brandt had each uttered: “It’s my job to know what you’re thinking.”

“Then you know what I’m going to do now,” Preston replies, and his son nods, which leads to our next post concerning Atonement with the Father.

HeroesjourneyRebirthTransformationNEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston meets with Father: Beginning of the Return