the tao of jaklumen

the path of the sage must become the path of the hero


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John Preston’s son Robbie: Guardian at the Threshold

Cimmy, myself, and the kids are observing an unplugged week, so it’s time for a week+ of reruns. Also, I’ve been in horrid pain, so creating new posts is tough. Please enjoy (even if you’ve read this before).

Many thanks to my wife, Cimmorene, for pointing this detail out to me.

“What are you doing?”

In Dreams and a Lack of Prozium: Supernatural Aid, a dream jars John Preston from his usual routine.  This is the question his son, Robbie (Matthew Harbour), asks him after the vial of Prozium smashes on the floor.  Preston is silent, almost in a daze.

It should be noted that Robbie was markedly shown in Preston’s dream, looking on as Viviana was handcuffed and taken away.

“I said, what are you doing?”

Robbie confronts his father. Still as seen on the Equilibrium fansite.

When Preston explains that the incident was an accident, Robbie instructs him to go by Equilibrium (one of the Prozium centers) and log the loss. It is hinted by now that Robbie is training to be a Tetragrammaton Cleric (especially as he is shown in a much earlier scene amongst the masses). It is not clear, however, how he is a guardian to the Threshold, but this will be explained later.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: John Preston Meets Mary O’Brien: Guide and Goddess

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Dreams and a Lack of Prozium: Supernatural Aid

Cimmy, myself, and the kids are observing an unplugged week, so it’s time for a week+ of reruns. Also, I’ve been in horrid pain, so creating new posts is tough. Please enjoy (even if you’ve read this before).

I was going to gloss over the step of Supernatural Aid.  This film is part science fiction, action, and thriller, in a dystopian world, which is not typical for other modern examples of the Monomyth so frequently cited by others.

But I remembered from the DVD commentary that Kurt Wimmer himself said that Sean Bean (as Errol Partridge) had some of the best lines in the film, a scene referenced in my previous post, Partridge forsakes his training: John Preston’s Call to Adventure.

Besides quoting the poem “He Wishes for The Cloths of Heaven”, Partridge says, “You always knew,” and asks “I assume you dream, Preston?”

These words set up the next scene, which IS a dream, is a memory of John’s wife, Viviana (Maria Pia Calzone).  It is a rude awakening, as his home is raided and she is arrested, on the charge of sense offense.  This dream, after a fashion, is the Supernatural Aid.

Immediately after the dream, Preston awakes (highlighted by a memory of one of Father’s broadcasted speeches: “Libria, awake”) and visibly realizes that the separate bed his wife had slept in is empty (we learn later that she was executed by incineration).

Preston goes to splash cold water on his face and take his morning interval of Prozium.  Without thinking, he takes out the vial for that interval from the injection gun (Prozium is administered at the neck) and places it on the counter, which he accidentally knocks over and smashes on the floor, as he sets down the towel he dried his face with.

These events trigger the Threshold, and introduce its guardians and guides, which will be explored in the next post.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: John Preston’s son Robbie: Guardian at the Threshold

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Daily Prompt: Twilight Zone

Now and then, one of the daily prompts grabs my attention, even though I don’t follow them specifically.  (I prefer to draw from the Weekly Photo Challenges on the Daily Post.)  But Green Embers’ fictional story drew me right in.  His reference to 911 reminded me of when my son last called it on my behalf (apparently after learning about it at school).  I related the story to HuntMode on her Alert & Warning Center ~ Ever Wondered? post.

Ever have an experience that felt surreal, as though you’d been suddenly transported into the twilight zone, where time seemed to warp, perhaps slowing down or speeding up?

1959 Series Logo

I would guess that for many people, mention of “the twilight zone” gets them thinking of Rod Serling‘s series of the same name.  But I think of this 1982 hit by Dutch rock band Golden Earring (NOTE: video is NSFW; skip this if a brief flash of side boob offends):

Surreal.  It comes from the word surrealism, or surréalisme in French, literally, “beyond realism”.  The Free Dictionary defines it thus:

A 20th-century literary and artistic movement that attempts to express the workings of the subconscious and is characterized by fantastic imagery and incongruous juxtaposition of subject matter.

Most notably, the Surrealists were inspired by dreams.

I am a day late to this prompt, but again, it seems like answering it was a natural course of action.  Only a day before, Steph Rogers wrote a post about a lucid dream she had.

This is a quick post but something I had to get out because I am feeling creeped out by it. Last night I was aware and conscious inside my own dream.  It was the strangest thing!

I don’t think she intended to respond to this prompt at all… but it fits, doesn’t it?  Several bloggers commented and assured her that lucid dreaming can be a great thing.

A composite image of my son sleeping with his DreamLight and my Uncle Fester face superimposed on the side, with some wizardry from the GIMP

A composite image of my son sleeping with his DreamLight and my Uncle Fester face superimposed on the side, with some wizardry from the GIMP

But my dreams are bizarre, and not even in the cool way.

I can’t find the comment threads or the blogger that directed me to a Huffington Post article called Is This Why Some People Are Able To Remember Their Dreams Better Than Others? days before.  But I gathered that if I wasn’t sleeping well, I remembered dreams more.  I especially tended to remember dreams during naps.

Dreams can be part of the Hero’s Journey.  Please see Dreams and a Lack of Prozium: Supernatural Aid in my Equilibrium series for an example.

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John Preston’s son Robbie: Guardian at the Threshold

Many thanks to my wife, Cimmorene, for pointing this detail out to me.

“What are you doing?”

In Dreams and a Lack of Prozium: Supernatural Aid, a dream jars John Preston from his usual routine.  This is the question his son, Robbie (Matthew Harbour), asks him after the vial of Prozium smashes on the floor.  Preston is silent, almost in a daze.

It should be noted that Robbie was markedly shown in Preston’s dream, looking on as Viviana was handcuffed and taken away.

“I said, what are you doing?”

Robbie confronts his father. Still as seen on the Equilibrium fansite.

When Preston explains that the incident was an accident, Robbie instructs him to go by Equilibrium (one of the Prozium centers) and log the loss. It is hinted by now that Robbie is training to be a Tetragrammaton Cleric (especially as he is shown in a much earlier scene amongst the masses). It is not clear, however, how he is a guardian to the Threshold, but this will be explained later.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: John Preston Meets Mary O’Brien: Guide and Goddess


Leave a comment

Dreams and a Lack of Prozium: Supernatural Aid

I was going to gloss over the step of Supernatural Aid.  This film is part science fiction, action, and thriller, in a dystopian world, which is not typical for other modern examples of the Monomyth so frequently cited by others.

But I remembered from the DVD commentary that Kurt Wimmer himself said that Sean Bean (as Errol Partridge) had some of the best lines in the film, a scene referenced in my previous post, Partridge forsakes his training: John Preston’s Call to Adventure.

Besides quoting the poem “He Wishes for The Cloths of Heaven”, Partridge says, “You always knew,” and asks “I assume you dream, Preston?”

These words set up the next scene, which IS a dream, is a memory of John’s wife, Viviana (Maria Pia Calzone).  It is a rude awakening, as his home is raided and she is arrested, on the charge of sense offense.  This dream, after a fashion, is the Supernatural Aid.

Immediately after the dream, Preston awakes (highlighted by a memory of one of Father’s broadcasted speeches: “Libria, awake”) and visibly realizes that the separate bed his wife had slept in is empty (we learn later that she was executed by incineration).

Preston goes to splash cold water on his face and take his morning interval of Prozium.  Without thinking, he takes out the vial for that interval from the injection gun (Prozium is administered at the neck) and places it on the counter, which he accidentally knocks over and smashes on the floor, as he sets down the towel he dried his face with.

These events trigger the Threshold, and introduce its guardians and guides, which will be explored in the next post.

NEXT POST IN THE SERIES: John Preston’s son Robbie: Guardian at the Threshold