the tao of jaklumen

the path of the sage must become the path of the hero


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For the people, by the people: Joe Cheray

A quick disclaimer

Generally speaking, I avoid talking about certain subjects– particularly politics, religion, money, and sex.  People can get very personally invested in such topics.  But I would like to make an exception this time.

A friend I met on Twitter would like to run to represent Kansas Congressional District 2, U.S. House of Representatives.  She needs some help with seed money, and I’ll tell you why, dear readers, why I am voicing my support.

A voice for the “average” Joe

I decided to run because I feel that the average person like myself is not being represented not only in Kansas but nationally as well. I am the average Kansan..

..I know what it is like to rise above circumstances. Those circumstances have shaped me into who I am today – a strong individual who can take my experiences and use them to help others who are not able to help themselves.

quote taken from Joe Cheray: Help me in my run for Kansas US House of Rep CD 2, at YouCaring – Compassionate Crowdfunding

Joe Cheray – A voice for the average Joe.  I think that could be a good campaign slogan.  Yet I think it’s important I emphasize that Joe has responded exceptionally to what a so-called “average” person can face.  Domestic violence, childhood sexual abuse, poverty, absentee parents, and broken family upbringing can face anyone; these issues know no gender, race, creed, or cultural background.  I have had the great privilege to get to know Joe through Twitter support chats addressing these issues, because I have experienced some of these issues myself.  I understand that she is very frustrated with how these issues are being addressed in her state.

At the same time, however, she knows some of my frustrations.  I’m not from Kansas, but instead, I live in Washington state.  Again, though, I know these issues still affect anyone, both in rural and urban cities.  I can tell you of friends that experienced these things that live in cities like Tacoma, but also friends that once lived in Yakima, where Cimmy was born and raised, and where I lived with her for a time.

I have grown up in rural, small town Kansas. I have also lived in some of the bigger cities in Kansas. So I understand the challenges that rural Kansans face as well as those that live in the cities I have lived in.

Again, I’m certain that Joe will say the same- that so many challenges do not come based on where you live or how well off the people who raised you were.

My funds are tight- 3 out of 4 of the people in my family are on disability, and yes, that means I have a child with special needs as well.  Please help me get the word out; I would like to see a friend have a chance to make a difference in our national government.  Regardless of whether the campaign run is successful, or not, I think Joe and her effort deserves all the help she can get.  Thanks.

See also The hidden story behind Candle in the Window


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Preston becomes a Sense Offender: Apotheosis

The unplugged week is over, but I still need time to get things done and prepare for spinal cord stimulator therapy.  Please continue to enjoy these posts (even if you’ve read this before).

Preston is so grief-stricken in public that Brandt arrests him for sense offense, first publicly shaming him to the masses before bringing him to Vice-Counsel Dupont.  In a clever turnaround, however, he leads Dupont to believe that Brandt was guilty of all his crimes, including the murder of the Sweeps in the Nether (see Preston further embraces emotion: Belly of the Whale).  Brandt is hauled off, presumably to meet judgement and execution by incineration.

Dupont informs Preston that while Brandt is guilty, his home must be searched according to the law.  Racing home, Preston goes to check the mirror of the bathroom where he had been hiding the Prozium, and discovers his son with the vials, apparently implying it wasn’t a very good hiding place.  Preston asks him, “How long?”, suspecting that somehow his son had ceased the dose and had hidden it better, even from him.  Robbie reveals that he and his sister had done so since their mother did.  Preston’s next question, “How did you know?” leads Robbie to utter a familiar refrain that Preston and Brandt had each uttered: “It’s my job to know what you’re thinking.”

“Then you know what I’m going to do now,” Preston replies, and his son nods, which leads to our next post concerning Atonement with the Father.

HeroesjourneyRebirthTransformationNEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston meets with Father: Beginning of the Return

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Just a quick word

I’ve been having some computer problems of late, and I can’t find my copy of Robert Bly’s Iron John: A Book About Men.  I haven’t figured out the magical formula that will get y’all to tell me how often you want me to post, but I’ll just quickly say the next post will have an audio recording of me reading Robert Bly’s telling of Der Eisenhans (Iron Hans, or Iron John) from that book.

Google Books had some samples from the book, but of course I couldn’t get that full text, which is the last chapter of the book.  So I’ll have to continue to look for that print copy.

Stay tuned, dear readers.  I think my recording setup is ready to go.


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still not quite 40 (and technically not 39 yet)

…because my birthdate, down to the hour, isn’t for about another 12 hours.  But that day in 1974 *was* a Saturday.

Apparently that was important enough to me to kick my mother repeatedly en utero before then, during a rather cheesy play called “Saturday’s Warrior” that many connected with the LDS/Mormon faith have mixed feelings about.  I almost wrote a post about how the story follows the Monomyth, but… people are still choking on the campy aspects of the script and I thought it best to let it lie.

I did find my Julie, however.  Some day, when people forget that story some more, I’ll talk about how elements of it ARE relevant to me.  Some of them are quite esoteric, so… I’ll likely be very vague.

My pain is still rather out of control, and I suffered another sleepless night, although new medicines are doing a much better job.

I spent some time yesterday celebrating with my father.  He is home alone for now because my mother went out of town to keep an eye on my grandmother as my grandfather had a hernia fixed (these are her parents).  So the usual family get-together was nixed, and hopefully for just this year.  Dad and I went to a fancy burger & spirits restaurant, which was nice, but I don’t want to make a tradition of it (especially as I don’t think I’ll have a $11-13 hamburger again anytime soon.)


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Preston becomes a Sense Offender: Apotheosis

Preston is so grief-stricken in public that Brandt arrests him for sense offense, first publicly shaming him to the masses before bringing him to Vice-Counsel Dupont.  In a clever turnaround, however, he leads Dupont to believe that Brandt was guilty of all his crimes, including the murder of the Sweeps in the Nether (see Preston further embraces emotion: Belly of the Whale).  Brandt is hauled off, presumably to meet judgement and execution by incineration.

Dupont informs Preston that while Brandt is guilty, his home must be searched according to the law.  Racing home, Preston goes to check the mirror of the bathroom where he had been hiding the Prozium, and discovers his son with the vials, apparently implying it wasn’t a very good hiding place.  Preston asks him, “How long?”, suspecting that somehow his son had ceased the dose and had hidden it better, even from him.  Robbie reveals that he and his sister had done so since their mother did.  Preston’s next question, “How did you know?” leads Robbie to utter a familiar refrain that Preston and Brandt had each uttered: “It’s my job to know what you’re thinking.”

“Then you know what I’m going to do now,” Preston replies, and his son nods, which leads to our next post concerning Atonement with the Father.

HeroesjourneyRebirthTransformationNEXT POST IN THE SERIES: Preston meets with Father: Beginning of the Return