the tao of jaklumen

the path of the sage must become the path of the hero

On a bit more personal note.

4 Comments

I’m sorry, I just can’t get behind the eager and optimistic sentiment about WordPress.

I’ll be blunt.  I have trust issues.  And I am growing increasingly disenchanted with the modern lifestyle.  I see people growing more insular, more busy with busy work, more self-absorbed.

I was at the park today with family, celebrating my mother’s birthday.  Once again I observed that the largest group of people hanging out there were Hispanic.  I don’t mean that to sound racist… I think many Hispanics in America are the new working and possibly middle class.  They are doing all the things I dimly remember as a child.  They have the picnics at the parks.  They are still actively doing the homesteading chores that many are starting to look at as old-fashioned now– more and more I am finding the old things I need at stores catering to Hispanic clientele.  They are not rediscovering things because it was on some blog; they are still living them.  Of course, I turn on Spanish-language TV and continue to marvel how much formats they do that the white mainstream discarded 20, 30, even 40 years ago.

My point is that my immediate world around me, is not home.  I live in an apartment still, not a house.  I have loving family and a caring church congregation– but most of my peers are hopelessly busy with their own stuff.  Speaking about Hispanic culture, while I’m out on a tangent, well… the Spanish-language VOX blogs I read (including “esto es genial”, which was a response to “this is good”)… they were among the first things to die.

I think I knew that the family-friendly, homey, folksy feel of VOX was really a marketing ploy.  But I believed in it.  For every few people I met who were young, snarky, sometimes unmarried and didn’t have kids, there was at least one who was family folk.

That’s gone now.  WordPress does not cater to families or “down home” folks.  They never will.  “Stuff White People Like” is a WordPress blog– intellectuals sniffing about hipsters.  LiveJournal will writhe and twist in geek teen angst, no matter how much they swear up and down they relate to older people.  Facebook will still be a dumping ground for time-wasting games and every little jerk who pretends their shit don’t stink.  6A in general will be forever looking for the next advertising deal.

Or you can just say that I don’t like change.  I’ve always marched to the beat of my own drum.

Author: jaklumen

Wherever you see "jaklumen", that's me- the username is still unique as of the current year. Be aware that the facet you see, is only a small part of the me that is me.

4 thoughts on “On a bit more personal note.

  1. “Stuff White People Like” is a WordPress blog– intellectuals sniffing about hipsters.

    That’s disgusting. It seems to me that the main mistake 6A made with Vox was not really appreciating it for what they made it to be; a specifically useful service for specific people. But as you know, the world turned into one collective attention whore in 2008 when everyone’s mom got on the facebook. Suddenly it was cool to not be private, until people recently figured out that’s not so cool. Vox could have been remarketed as the place to go for the aftermath, but everyone’s focus is back on what to do with the main blogging arenas, now that all of earth is a giant mirror.

    That’s why I think I (most of the time) have the knack of being only public, but seeming private. I tell you real details about my day, but if you think about it, they’re not terribly “personal,” in the sense that once I close my computer and go hang out with my kids, that’s entirely for me, and you only ever see the silly tidbits of it that I carefully sort through to offer. Even if I talk about my back problems or something, it’s framed in a philosophical sense rather than a true exchange of intimacy. Then, in whatever comments I get, I can measure out the intimacy, more or less, depending on who I’m talking with. I do the same thing with Twitter; people think I’m being very intimate, but it’s all on my terms.

    Too many people started having public hangovers and the rest of us are repulsed.

    Vox could have been more fully marketed as the online place where you could make a refuge either for that or away from it. Who wouldn’t want to advertise in such a space?

    I love picnics. This whole summer was so strangely hot, I feel we missed out on weeks and weeks of family fun potential. But the boys played a lot of baseball and swam in their friend’s pool, so that was good.

    Like

    • That’s disgusting.

      More so, I’d say, when I learned how fast and far the response fanned out. Dawn V. shared a tidbit from “Stuff Black People Don’t Like” in a commentary about Black History month. Turns out it’s a Blogspot/Blogger blog, complete with the lack of slick formatting (in comparison to WP) Blogger’s sadly become known for. I asked her more about it and apparently there were a ton of copycat blogs in response for various ethnic/racial groups and had gotten out of hand.

      Vox could have been remarketed as the place to go for the aftermath, but everyone’s focus is back on what to do with the main blogging arenas, now that all of earth is a giant mirror.

      Vox could have been more fully marketed as the online place where you could make a refuge either for that or away from it. Who wouldn’t want to advertise in such a space?

      No doubt. I would say the world’s still trying to figure out a more public face to such an inherently flat medium, especially the more extroverted sorts of people in the world. I think that’s why the term “social network” came about and why mobile microcomputers are developed as they are today. I think it’s an illusory appeal against the old computer nerd stereotype– you’re not lost in your own little electronic world– you’re interacting with people! But until people start looking more like sci-fi cyborgs, they’re still staring at a flat screen, poking at some keys, and probably sitting down to do it.

      When I started exploring cyberspace, the communities I found were primarily composed of fairly quiet, reserved people. From what I could see with them and myself, online interaction was often a pathway to “breaking out of one’s shell”, as it were. I think many of us might be retracting back inside. Back then, a friend of mine went out to Florida to meet an online contact. His partner (I sometimes say “common law wife” although no such law exists here) he met online; she moved here from NY. Both of them are much more reclusive now. Cimmy and I went out to Ann Arbor to meet an online community. For a while, recently… I didn’t get out much.

      That’s why I think I (most of the time) have the knack of being only public, but seeming private. I tell you real details about my day, but if you think about it, they’re not terribly “personal,” in the sense that once I close my computer and go hang out with my kids, that’s entirely for me, and you only ever see the silly tidbits of it that I carefully sort through to offer.

      I’m sure that’s a good approach. I’m not quite so sure where the balance should lie for me.

      Like

  2. Everyone should seek their own balance, for sure. A whole lot of people don’t seem to be even trying, do they? And then they’re surprised by the result. It’s an ongoing process, online and off. And, too, just like the rest of life, has periods of higher or lower activity, or at least, it should.

    I love that I’ve made real friends at various sites that I could meet and enjoy in person. I’ve always sought out “people like me” in just such a way. After all, we hardly meet each other, otherwise! We are quiet and don’t recognize a common spirit or know what to do if we do. Back when I first started, I thought of everyone online as my “penpals,” and loved getting to know them. So I was weirded out that people were so paranoid they assumed everyone else on line was *not* real, something awful and scary. And now they’ve gone completely in the other direction, much too far!

    Seeking balance is the natural tao of life. Online can be natural, but only if we are. And of course there will still be the disgusting and puerile, just like out here.

    Like

  3. I admire the way other cultures enjoy their families and friends. It does seem to be a lost art.

    There so much I could say about this but I need to practice the art of positive thinking. I am holding my fingers back. My lips are sealed. Loose lips sink ships.

    Gaaaaaaaaah!!!!!!!! Must get some sleep now.

    Like

Walk with me, talk with me. Leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s