the tao of jaklumen

the path of the sage must become the path of the hero

Disconnecting from Facebook entirely?

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The news I am reading about Facebook's increasing erosion of privacy has me worried, and if it wasn't the sole means for me to keep in contact with certain friends and family members, I'd be dropping it faster than a quick-burning match.  Of course, the difference is I plan to delete and then pray my data isn't mined for malicious purposes.

Leo Laporte deleted his account.  I have relied on him as a news source for technology, so that caught my attention immediately.

I could post a slew of articles if others are interested, but I'll just try to sum up instead.  Facebook's Instant Personalization isn't the latest erosion, but it allows by default for outsiders to plunder your information with impunity.  And the more I hear about Mark Zuckerberg, the more I think he's just another example of white-collar sociopathy.  Yeah, that's incredibly cruel, but that's really how I see some hackers– they don't give a shit about other people, but are simply interested in what they can get away with as they tinker.

Now some of that may simply be youthful impetuousness.  All the more reason.  The guy's only in his early twenties.  Sure I have met twentysomethings that were thoughtful and mature.  I don't think he's one of them.  And I tend to agree that the "white hat" and "black hat" terminology of recent decades is pretty arbitrary– it's just too easy for a hacker to play both sides.

He's called trusting users "dumb fucks".  A Facebook employee (supposedly off-record) said Zuckerberg doesn't believe in privacy.  A few months ago, e-mail addresses that were supposedly held private were suddenly public.  Even a well-known egoblogger, Robert Scoble, has addressed his concerns, and specifically to Zuckerberg, too.

I tend to agree with what Fred Wilson has said: Currently, Facebook is in a dangerous middle ground between privacy and transparency– a nebulous sort of semi-privacy.  You can't have it both ways.  If it's totally public, then the burden falls on the user to mind what they say, and can reasonably expect to have it appear anywhere.  The argument could be made that nothing on the Internet is private, but I don't think such absolutes apply everywhere.  I think gated communities such as VOX offer some degree of privacy, although it shouldn't be overestimated.  And I must insist that it's not as vaguely defined as it's being defined at Facebook.

I did voice my concerns in my News Feed, but not a single person responded.  That's really too bad.  I think I'm just going to have to proceed and then send out some e-mails, and see who cares then.

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Author: jaklumen

Wherever you see "jaklumen", that's me- the username is still unique as of the current year. Be aware that the facet you see, is only a small part of the me that is me.

11 thoughts on “Disconnecting from Facebook entirely?

  1. I heard about this on CNN this morning. It would be different if people knew what they were getting into when they opened Facebook accounts, but from what I understand Facebook chose to make private information available to marketing partners that people believed would be kept private when they joined. Sounds like a real violation of trust and privacy to me.

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  2. Bingo! That's it, precisely. If they had been clear from the start, I think things would have gone better, but Schmuckerberg thinks he can just erode it gradually and people won't care over the long term. Wrong, wrong, wrong 😦 Some of us care very much.

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  3. I think gated communities such as VOX offer some degree of privacy, although it shouldn't be overestimated.The problem with VOX is if you aren't careful with your choice of privacy settings you can find your writings out there on Google searches.I am not happy with Facebook's openness…but I tend to really watch what I say out there as there are many real life people out there that I am friends with. I have not done any research on this. I haven't even followed any of your links…I don't have time right now, but maybe I will be able to follow and read them tomorrow.

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  4. The problem with VOX is if you aren't careful with your choice of
    privacy settings you can find your writings out there on Google
    searches.Precisely. If you don't set post restrictions, it's as open as can be.I haven't even followed any of your links…I don't have time right
    now, but maybe I will be able to follow and read them tomorrow.Take your time. I haven't even listed them all; there are far, far, more. And since it's been several things over a good length of time, I don't think I've covered all of it. I forgot to mention the latest policy is being discussed on the Senate floor, a push for an opt-in, instead of the opt-out it is now. No joke.

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  5. I nuked my Facebook account because I didn't like the way the wind was blowing. It isn't easy. And all my data is still over there, such as it is, for the enjoyment of commerce. Ultimately this is the cost of "free."

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  6. Really like your new banner, btw!

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  7. Diaspora is being presented as an alternative. Found out about it in one of my tech news feeds. Would be interested to know your thoughts.

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  8. I would care too. Facebook is really taking advantage of its users.

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  9. I felt forced into signing up for it last summer. I used a fake name and have never had any setting visible to the public, even when they changed the defaults the past two times, because it was already friends only or private.

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  10. Agreed. It's much nicer to have something you can pick up and put down on your own free will. Facebook is getting more and more difficult to leave, and that's part of what's bothering me.BUT. I wish those people I have to see there would dump it, so I could, too.Yeah, exactly. Fortunately, though, no one has insisted I use it. I sent a message, as I said, to as many Facebook contacts as I had e-mail address for (and wished to contact). Got another reply today and I figure more will slowly trickle in. The burden is on them to stay in touch; I won't worry too much about it otherwise.

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  11. You know, it's definitely off-putting when people you're actually related to say "oh, if you want to get in touch with me, you'll have to use Facebook because otherwise I don't bother."

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